“The tax system is disgraceful, and what amazes is that, despite wide agreement on that point, and despite so many good intentions, so little has been done to fix it.”
Jeffrey Frank reflects on the four-decade tax war: http://nyr.kr/1gLoqCr (via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

whitehouse:

Many Rosie the Riveters earned equal pay for equal work in the 1940s.

It’s long past time to ensure equal pay today.

humansofnewyork:

"I’m going to be a basketball player. Or a taxation lawyer."

newsweek:

It began hundreds of years ago, deep in the Albanian Alps—an unusual tradition where women, with limited options in life, took the oath of the burrnesha. A pledge to live as a man. To dress like a man, to work like a man, to assume the burdens and the liberties of a man.

But these freedoms came with a price: The burrneshas also made a pledge of lifelong celibacy. Today these sworn virgins live on, but their numbers have dwindled. Many Albanians don’t even know they exist.

What happens when the society that created you no longer needs you? And how do you live in the meantime?

The Oath of the Burrnesha: Women Living as Men in the Albanian Alps

afp-photo:

AFGHANISTAN, Kabul : Afghan boys take flight on swings at a fair set up in a field near the Sahki Shrine during Nowruz festivities which marks the Afghan New Year in Kabul on March 21, 2014. Nowruz, one of the biggest festivals of the war-scarred nation, marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in the Persian calendar. Parents with their children celebrate the New Year by participating in the fair set up near the shrine. AFP PHOTO/ROBERTO SCHMIDT

newsweek:

There is the Philadelphia you know and the Philadelphia you will never see. The first summons a cornucopia of familiar images: Benjamin Franklin, Rocky Balboa, cheesesteaks whiz wit.

The second is safely out of view from the cobblestone streets of Society Hill or the brewpubs of Northern Liberties. But if you wander north on Broad Street, well past the alabaster phallus of City Hall, you may glimpse the first hints of that obscure Philadelphia in the emptied husk of the Divine Lorraine Hotel, a sullied spinster with more than a century of stories but nobody to hear them anymore.

Shortly thereafter start the Badlands, North Philadelphia neighborhoods like Kensington, whose row-house lanes were once home to working-class whites whose modestly prosperous lives were circumscribed by the factory, the church, the union hall, the front stoop and the bar.

On a summer Sunday, a trip to Connie Mack Stadium or an outing to the Jersey Shore. Then cue the familiar midcentury forces: minority influx, white flight, factories moving to China, crack, crack babies, the end of welfare as we know it, here at the end of the land, the Philadelphia you will never know.

I drove through the Badlands with Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman, two journalists for the Philadelphia Daily News who shared a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and are the authors of Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love.

The book is based on a newspaper series, “Tainted Justice,” that revealed such an astounding degree of corruption among Philadelphia’s drug cops that you would not quite believe it in a Martin Scorsese movie. But your belief, or lack thereof, is irrelevant, because this story is true.

The Streets of Killadelphia

“The only things that interest me in the U.S. are Tupac Shakur, Allen Ginsberg, and Jackson Pollock.”

explore-blog:

Anonymous companies are controlling more than you think, and 2014 TED Prize winner Charmain Gooch is launching a campaign against them.